ADDING EMOTION TO LOTTERY GAMING

MAKING DREAMS COME TRUE

 

THE CHALLENGE:

In the USA our client works with several state lotteries to help them create and manage their lottery brands and increase sales. For the Arkansas state scholarship lottery, the challenge was to understand why their communications were not having the desired cut through with consumers and how to address stagnant lottery ticket sales. Moreover, as a mid-west state, Arkansas historically has had a largely conservative attitude towards gambling and gaming so this also needed to be taken into account in terms of what might be possible in terms of communication strategy.

OUR APPROACH:

In our qualitative research, which combined both focus groups and immersive interviews, we discovered much about the hidden appeal of the lottery and attitudes towards gaming that was to prove valuable in shaping a more inclusive and effective communications programme for the state.

DRIVING ENGAGEMENT THROUGH EMPATHY, NOT GAMES:

Our insight revealed that existing lottery comms focused almost exclusively on announcing new games and ‘how to play’. But, the motivations for playing were almost always absent. In exposing consumers to a range of alternative lottery communications used around the world we were able to identify the right communication ‘territory’, message and tonality that allowed for more emotional engagement with Arkansas consumers. In particular, this needed to chime in with the down to earth and community-spirited values of Arkansas residents.

POSITIVE OUTCOMES:

The adoption of a new approach to strategic comms has paid dividends. In the 12 months since adopting a more emotional approach to comms, one that allows consumers to dream of winning and support education, sales of lottery tickets in the state have risen by nearly 13.5% to $549m.

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STATS:

QUALITATIVE:

Extended qualitative focus groups and interviews with lottery players and non-players.

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